Building COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence: Compiling Evidence and Supporting Communities in Vaccine Acceptance and Distribution

The president’s National Strategy goal to vaccinate the U.S. population quickly, effectively, and equitably requires wide-scale, unbiased distribution and access, and public confidence in the safety of the vaccine and the vaccination effort. Efforts to get shots into arms must carefully and authentically engage communities to increase acceptance and confidence. Building trust and trustworthiness through transparent communication and mobilized communities lays a foundation for achieving these objectives.

Garnering widespread public confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine starts with a comprehensive approach flexible enough to respond to a rapidly changing environment and responsive enough to meet diverse community needs. Success is not a series of siloed activities, but the coordinated interplay of insights delivered through operational excellence. Knowing what influences decisions about COVID-19 vaccination among unique groups, and whether these factors promote or inhibit acceptance, helps local implementers develop strategies that align with the needs of their communities.

Need for Vaccine Confidence Building

Vaccine Supply and Distribution

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Vaccine Supply and Distribution

  • Utilize and build on infrastructures
  • Get vaccines to communities
  • Get "shots in arms"
  • Equitable access
  • Science-first public health campaign

Diverse Reasons for Vaccine Hesitancy

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Diverse Reasons for Vaccine Hesitancy

Diverse reasons by race/ethnicity, culture, beliefs, misinformation, concerns, age, mindset, location, ease of access, rural/urban, etc.

Strategies to Increase Vaccine Confidence for diverse groups

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Strategies to Increase Vaccine Confidence for diverse groups

Strategies require:
  • Access to science-based information in formats to address diverse audience needs
  • Awareness of resources and local assets
  • State and local engagement
  • Community connections and shared solutions

100 million vaccinations in first 100 days

Reach population immunity by mid-summer 2021

Fully reopen schools and businesses and restore economy

 

Key Components to Effectively Build Vaccine Confidence

Increasing vaccine confidence requires multimodal methods to disseminate information in an integrated way that provides a clear focus and guides action. Science-based information alone is not enough. Strategies must garner and amplify the voices of trusted, diverse community members to develop messages that resonate. Science and local experience must intersect to advance knowledge and yield better resources.

 

Key Components to Effectively Build Vaccine Confidence

1.
Understanding COVID-19 vaccine decision making by engaging partners on the front lines
 
2.
Accessible repository of continuously curated resources and evidence
 
3.
Facilitating learning through collaborative activities and data-informed decision making
 
4.
Engaging dissemination partners for national and local awareness
 
5.
Rapid-cycle review for real-time program enhancement
 
 

Accelerating COVID-19 knowledge to drive solutions that meet clients’ needs

Mathematica is helping clients identify reasons for vaccine hesitancy among Black and Indigenous populations and people of color across multiple cities and tribal lands. We engage trusted partners in the community to support contact tracing in Washington State, and inform policy decisions at the University of San Diego with COVID-19 agent-based network modeling. We curate emerging COVID-19 knowledge on a variety of topics and with the National Academy of State Health Policy to map states’ contact-tracing efforts.

Creating a repository of curated resources and evidence for action and change

Mathematica offers a range resources, from rapidly built and curated repositories to support COVID-19 response, to comprehensive sources of well-vetted scientific evidence, such as the What Works Clearinghouse. We balance these offerings to meet clients’ diverse needs, from just-in-time evidence to rigorous literature reviews. Human-centered design makes our websites functional based on users’ needs. Social media powers widespread information sharing. Web-based libraries of curated materials make reliable information easily accessible.

Using data and insights to guide interactive, collaborative learning

Our approach to collaborative learning and technical assistance helps community partners drive decisions and turn ideas into action. We leverage data to inform learning, refine implementation, and highlight effective strategies. We engage local stakeholders and community-based organizations to share solutions and address local needs to implement change.

Our collaborative learning activities have local, regional, and national reach. The Mid-Atlantic Regional Education Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Education translates research into practice in coordination and collaboration with regional stakeholders. Our implementation support for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Accountable Health Communities Model provides a learning system, technical assistance, data management, and program monitoring to help local communities address the health-related social needs of Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. Through our partnership with the National Association of Health Data Organizations, we provided health data users with a COVID-19 learning community.

Rapidly mobilizing workforce and response

Public health jurisdictions need rapid assistance to reach ambitious vaccination goals and bring down COVID-19 infections. With more than 1,400 experts working across the country to apply experience at the intersection of data, methods, policy, and practice, Mathematica has the workforce and partnerships to mobilize highly skilled staff across the country.

Let's Progress Together

To learn more about our work in building vaccine confidence, contact Brigitte Manteuffel, Senior Fellow at BManteuffel@mathematica-mpr.com.